All India Handloom

Families in small northern villages of India coordinate their skills to produce hand woven and decorated articles. On a wooden loom, made by the village carpenter, the senior members of the family weave the cloth. The women of the household do the stitching and knotting, assisted by their children, who roll and separate threads.

The All India Handloom Society helps poor handloom weavers scattered all over India to organise and develop markets for their products, both within India and abroad. To help achieve this objective, the society runs a chain of retail stores in most of the larger cities in India - they have around 1100.

The superb cotton rugs have been woven "since time immemorial" especially for use in the palaces of Rajasthan. Around the start of the 20th century, the style was further popularised when the enlightened ruler of the town of Bikaner decreed that prison inmates should be given technical training on handlooms "with view to provide a source of livelihood for the prisoners after getting relieved from the jail, and maintain law and order in the society by reducing mischievous jobs by the people"

Since this time, different neo-classical designs reflecting old themes have flourished, and in the past few decades, the rugs, known locally as Punja Dhurries, have achieved great popularity throughout India and overseas.

Brand categories

All India Handloom

Loading, please wait...

Grid List

Grid List